My Kemang : SHARON ROSE LEASA

A body artist specializing in tattoos sheds light on the subculture

Body art became popular in Kemang in the late 1990s, with the arrival of backpackers and skateboarders who made body piercings and tattoos as common as clothing accessories. Today, Kemang is still the place to go for quality tattoos and piercings. Sharon Rose Leasa is a body modification artist at Skin Media Studio in Kemang and a member of Indonesian Subculture, a body art organization founded by Indonesian tattoo artist Ucha Cyberborg

How long have you been a tattoo artist? 
I’m not a tattoo artist. What I do is body art, which has always been my hobby, and I just happen to be into body modification, also known as piercing and tattooing. I’ve been working as a body artist for about two years, learning mostly from my friends.

Okay, so have you ever given a tattoo to anyone?
Yes, of course, I’ve tattooed many people, but I don’t do it every day. For me, tattooing is artwork. It’s another media of expression, just like paper, canvas or TV.

How do people react under the needle when you give a tatoo?
Usually someone who wants to get a tattoo kind of knows what to expect. It’s painful Photo dissy eKaPramuditabut the excitement usually tops that. Before I start the whole process, I always do a small line, to see how they react. Then I ask them if that feels alright before I continue.

Do you think a tattoo has to be meaningful?
Well, that depends on the person, but I would suggest getting something meaningful because that way you won’t get bored of it and you will have a story behind it.

So what do your tattoos mean to you?
Well, I was really close to my father when he was alive. Some of my tattoos are for him. I have his name on my right arm, and his zodiac which is a tiger on my left forearm. The flowers behind it remind me of him as well, because when I was little my dad always commented on these particular flowers.

Which part of the body is the most painful place to get a tattoo? 
On my foot, that was the most painful for me because it’s just bone. When I did the henna tattoo on my left foot, it was more of an experience to see how painful it is. I finished it, but if you look closer you’ll see it’s a bit chaotic.

Recently, your other half, Andy Besi, pierced your back and made it into a corset at a Subculture event in Kemang. Did that hurt?
Not at all, he’s a great artist and knows exactly where to pierce. In fact, I didn’t bleed at all. I believe that was the first time this was done in Indonesia.

Do you have any certain rules that you follow?
Whatever I do, there’s no limit. Once I get into something, I want to do it to the max.

What is Kemang to you?
Kemang is family. We are all family under Indonesian Subculture.

What’s Indonesian Subculture?
Indonesian Subculture is a body art community founded in 2004 by ucha Cyberborg. We started with 25 members from Jakarta, Bandung, Bali and Jogjakarta. Today, there are more than 170 members all around Indonesia, who consist of tattoo artists and body piercing artists. My group is based here in Kemang at Skin Media Studio

What’s the main purpose of the club?
Basically, we grant certification to body artists who are qualified to practice and uphold certain standards of body modification, including hygiene and safety. We also have regular events and gatherings to showcase skin art.

Do you think tattoos are becoming more acceptable in Indonesia?
In major cities they are, but in other places in Java tattoos are still unacceptable. Nowadays, tattoos are more of a fashion statement. Many public figures have made tattoos acceptable. It’s not cheap to get a tattoo so for some people it is a status symbol as well — I mean, instead of wearing a Rolex, a great tattoo is becoming an alternative.
Do you have any tips for people who want to get a tattoo?
On the day you’re getting a tattoo, make sure you are fit and sober for at least a day or two. A tattoo artist can tell if you have alcohol or drugs in your system. you tend to bleed more, and the ink color won’t be maximized.
What was the most memorable tattoo that you ever did?
One time my friend who just got out of jail, asked me to give him a tattoo, more of a symbol to start a new life, something fresh. It was an honor for me.

What other media do you use to express yourself?
I used to produced television ads and programs for Metro TV and SCTV. The first time Metro TV channel launched, they came to me for links to major music labels and exclusive one-on-one interviews with international musicians. So I did Metro Saturday Music Special and Music Blitz program for them, and I also did Kick N Rush for SCTV.

Did you ever get to interview anyone famous?
I interviewed James Hetfield from Metallica, Vanessa Mae and other international artists who came to Jakarta.

Sharon was talking to Iwan Putuhena

Original interview was published in Kemang Buzz

My Kemang: Sharon Rose Leasa

Picture by Dissy for Kemang Buzz

Fight Club: Baan Muay Thai

If you really think you can learn Muay Thai from an instructional video in the comfort of your living room, think again.

Most of us have at some time stood in front of a mirror imitating punches and kicks that we saw in a movie or at a fighting match, and aspired to perfect methods to kick some serious butt. However, learning how to fight from a champion trainer in a proper gym with the right equipment and a real opponent is a whole different experience – one that involves a high adrenalin rush.

There are many martial arts techniques that are taught in Jakarta such as karate, capoeira, Jiu-Jitsu, kickboxing, Aikido and many more. They are popular among Jakartans, and each has its own unique fighting style that can be learned either for self-defense or to get fit.

At Baan Muay Thai Club in Kemang, trainers and students explore one of the combat sports that originated in Thailand. Muay Thai means “Art of Eight Limbs,” because its points of contact involve punches, kicks, elbows and knees.

“For those who are not familiar with it they probably can’t differentiate between Muay Thai and kickboxing, but if you look closely our style is very different, and we use elbows and knees to strike,” says Ochit, manager of Baan Muay Thai.

The school was founded in late 2007 by a small community of guys who had been practicing Muay Thai since 2003. They decided to start the school because of the strong demand for martial arts training in the city.

“At that time, we had not seen any progress and development of Muay Thai in Jakarta,” Ochit says. “We were doing this as a hobby and practiced together among friends, but then we realized that there’s an opportunity to try to revive the old gym and create a new concept.”

Baan Muay Thai Club is owned by Francois Mohede, one of the vocalists for the pop band Lingua. His vision was simply to introduce Muay Thai to Indonesians and teach them that that the sport is not only a high impact martial art, but also a way to boost stamina, achieve an ideal body shape and tone muscles. But Muay Thai is not only a way to get fit; it can also be a lifestyle.

The club offers two kinds of classes: My Muay Thai, the regular training class, and Cardio Muay Thai, which uses Muay Thai techniques to create a calorie-burning workout.

“Basically, both classes use the same techniques, but we use the word ‘cardio’ to make it sound less frightening for beginners,” Ochit says. “The only difference is that Cardio Muay Thai focuses on repetition movements to burn calories and have fun, while My Muay Thai focuses on practicing sparring to learn your skills.”

 

Stress Relief

As beginners will discover, Muay Thai is a simple sport to learn – anyone can do it. If you know how to punch and kick, you just have to polish and develop your style and technique to do it the right way. The club provides all of the necessary equipment such as gloves, guards, punching bags and mats. Members only need to provide fighting hand wraps.

Since it opened, Baan Muay Thai has attracted more than 1,800 members and has 300 active students from many different countries.

“In the morning, you see some women come for self defense, but most of the ladies come here to get fit,” Ochit says. “In the evening, there are more teenagers and students that want to relieve stress, you know, from traffic jams – they just want to punch something.”

Prices for My Muay Thai lessons range between Rp 300,000 and Rp 550,000 depending on the number of sessions. A single Cardio Muay Thai lesson costs Rp 60,000, or you can choose a package of eight sessions for Rp 420,000. The sessions have anywhere from five to as many as 30 or so participants.

Currently, Baan Muay Thai has five trainers, including two professional fighters, Ankie and Denny.

“Ankie was a student and he’s been training for two years,” Ochit says. “We saw his development and improvement, so we sponsored him to fight, and now he is one of our trainers.”

In addition to providing classes, Baan Muay Thai also participates in international fighting tournaments and sponsors fighters to represent the club. In May this year, both Denny and Ankie won a tournament in Phuket, Thailand.

On July 9, Baan Muay Thai will host Indonesia’s first Muay Thai tournament. The event will be held in Seminyak, Bali, next to the beach with international fighters and participants from eight countries including Thailand, Australia, Spain and New Zealand.

“It will be an exciting event, especially for the Muay Thai community in Indonesia,” says Ochit.

Iwan Putuhena Reports

Original article was published in Kemang Buzz

Fight Club: Baan Muay Thai

Pictures by Dissy for Kemang Buzz

So Fresh, So Clean: AutoBridal Prioritas 9

With an estimated 12 million vehicles, a car wash service in this capital city is a business always in demand. To meet the needs of busy customers who never have time to bring in their car, or just simply don’t want to waste an hour in a waiting room, some car wash services are reinventing themselves.

At AutoBridal Prioritas 9 in Kemang, a car wash is more than just a car wash. With a service concept based on the simple idea that it’s not just your car that needs pampering. So while your car is given a New and Wet Look, you, too, can spoil yourself.

At AutoBridal you no longer have to wait in boredom, or sit in an uncomfortable chair, reading last year’s magazines. There are air-conditioned lounges with comfortable couches, TV, Wi-Fi, a swimming pool, massage services and a children’s playground. The Strudels Factory House & Cake café serves a selection of Indonesian food, Italian pastas, coffee and other beverages.

“We’re in the service industry business, so besides focusing on car care, we provide a place that is comfortable,” says Bismel, shop manager at AutoBridal Kemang. “We want you to leave here feeling rested with a clean car and a full stomach.”

AutoBridal started as franchise in 2009, with its first shop in Bandung. Since then, it has expanded to more than 90 outlets nationwide, and one in Malaysia. The Kemang outlet was opened in September 2010.

In addition to the extra facilities and the conveniences AutoBridal offers, washing your car here offers satisfying results for the best price. The price range for Ice Cream car wash with hydraulic system starts at Rp 40,000, with extra charges for additional services such as Exotic Exterior, Interior, Paint Protection, Anti-Rust, or Total Salon Service.

When it comes to car care products, selecting the right soap is critical for preventing damage on the body paint. AutoBridal uses a PH balance 7 to clean your car, just the appropriate level to protect the paint and maintain the right shine on your car. “If you or your driver at home washes with regular soap, it will be dull and can damage the paint within three months,” says Bismel.

AutoBridal offers memberships that features benefits, including discounted prices for year-round car wash services, free vouchers and other promotions. Membership price at AutoBridal range from Rp 1.5 million, and certain plans can be used at any AutoBridal outlets. Currently there are more than 400 members at AutoBridal Prioritas 9 in Kemang, and new customers are joining every day.

In such a busy place, the average waiting time for a car wash is approximately one hour. With eight hydraulics systems, AutoBridal manages to wash and rotate cars faster than any other car wash in the area.

The shop is open until midnight on weekdays and until 1 am on weekends. “We are really busy on weekends, in the morning and afternoon usually there are a lot of families. At night young people come in to wash their cars before they go out and party,” says Bismel.

It is not unusual to spot exotic cars at the shop; in fact, those cars regularly need care more than the average cars. In addition to servicing cars, AutoBridal Prioritas 9 also washes Harley Davidson motorcycles. And as more celebrity customers join as members, the shop often looks more like a car show than a car wash, according to Bismel. “I have seen Ferrari California, Maserati, Mercedes Benz, BMW and countless of Hummer cars,” he says.

With AutoBridal Prioritas 9 in Kemang, there is no excuse to be driving a dirty car. So step out of the ordinary, spoil yourself and treat your car to a five-star wash.

Iwan Putuhena Reports

Original article was published in Kemang Buzz

So Fresh, So Clean: AutoBridal Prioritas 9

Pictures by Dissy for Kemang Buzz

AutoBridal Prioritas 9

Jl. Kemang Raya No. 41
Tel: 021 7181560
www.autobridal.com

Opening Hours
Weekdays 09.00 am – 12.00am
Weekend 09.00 am – 10.00 am

Higher Learning at Spinach DJ Academy

Being a professional DJ has gained respectability over the last decade. Back in the 90’s, a DJ’s public image was often associated with drugs and underground parties, but that is no longer the case. These days, taking DJ lessons is regarded by young musicians as not much different from learning the piano.

Spinach DJ Academy, the first DJ school in Kemang, opened in 2005. Founded by Riri Mestica, one of Jakarta’s most respected DJs, Spinach has grown not only as a DJ-training center but now also includes Spinach Records. The academy has trained about 600 students in the past five years, and about 200 former Spinach students are now practicing DJs.

“DJ School is for everyone, whether you’re learning it as a hobby or pursuing a career. There is no age limit,” says Ricky Tampubolon, distribution manager at Spinach Records. To give the students real-life experience while learning, Spinach integrates practical training sessions in the local clubs. “One of the advantages of taking courses with us is that we have a job training program at Barcode,” Ricky says, referring to Riri’s outdoor terrace and club located in Code Fin Kemang.

Students at Spinach are offered the opportunity to try their hand at performing for audiences at events like Royal Rumble, which is held every two months to give students the opportunity to demonstrate their DJ skills in clubs around Kemang.

Every student is introduced to the basic manual old-school equipment: a turntable and a vinyl. In the 80’s, before the CDJ era, DJs worked with two turntables and a microphone. Spinach students have to learn basic turntable skills before they can use Pioneer CDJ. “A turntable is much more difficult because everything is manual, if you can handle that, then moving on to CDJ will be a lot easier,” says Ricky.

At the end of the day, being a DJ is all about a love of music and the joy of making people dance. So what does it take to be a good DJ? “Some just have ambition, and they make it easily,” says Ricky. “But you need to have the whole package — talent, looks and the ability to socialize.”

DJ Gladiator is a former student who took a two-month Basic DJ Class at Spinach last year, and now plays progressive house music regularly at clubs such as 999, Musro, Domain, Barcode and Bloeming, as well as private parties around the city. “When I first joined Spinach, I started from zero,” says DJ Gladiator. He chose Spinach, he adds, because of DJ Riri, who inspired him to pursue a career as a DJ. Spinach has opened doors to advance his career. “The instructors never stop teaching us, even after we finish the program,” he says.

Most students at Spinach range from their 20s to their 30s. “In general it’s never too old to learn anything. Any music lover or anyone with a music background can be a DJ,” says Luckyta, a finance executive at Spinach Records.

Spinach DJ Academy also has some teen students. Thirteen-year-old DJ Putri Danizar has already had a lot of experience on the DJ set and was among the top ten of SE7ENTUuNE Next Generation DJ Contest last year at the Jakarta Convention Center. “Lucky me, not everyone has an opportunity like I did at such a young age,” says Putri.

DJ lessons can be taken for fun, not just to build a career. “We used to have a student who worked at Pertamina, and he would come in wearing his work suit,” says Ricky.

Like any other hobby, being a DJ doesn’t come with a cheap price tag. The club standard equipment, Pioneer CDJ 1000, costs about Rp 15 million, and a DJ needs two of those, plus a mixer, headphone, speaker and Apple laptop, the most essential tool. If you take courses at Spinach, all that equipment is provided.

Spinach DJ Academy offers many different types of classes; basic DJ class, basic private class, club DJ class, turntablism class, digital DJ class, and electronic & dance master class, with the price of courses ranging from Rp 800,000 to Rp 6.5 million.

For students who want to make a career of DJ-ing, it’s easy to get back your investment on the expensive equipment. “Yyou can make around 1 million a gig, for beginners, and female DJs sometimes can make more,” says Ricky.

DJ Deena Rhythm, a female R&B DJ based in Jakarta, plays regularly at nightclubs such as Domain, Equinox, Tribeca NYyC and has also performed abroad. She decided to become a DJ because of her love for R&B music. “I enjoy playing music and it’s not easy to master Hip-Hop/R&B,” she says. Deena ignores sexist bias in the business about the skills of female DJs. “I don’t pay any mind to what other people say, and most of the guys are my friends. DJs have a bond with each other.”

Iwan Putuhena Reports

Original article was published in Kemang Buzz

Higher Learning at Spinach DJ Academy

Pictures by Dissy for Kemang Buzz

Spinach DJ Academy/Spinach Records

Jl. Kemang 1 No. 12H,
Tel: 021 719 0584
Fax: 021 719 5127
spinachrecords.com
spinachrec.wordpress.com

Definition of Cool: 707

Merchandise at 707 offers fashion beyond mainstream trends and styles, delivering urban designer brands not yet available in the rest of Jakarta.

“Sometimes we are six months ahead, compared to the other stores in the city,” says 707 General Manager Nana.

Nana, a 20-something young woman with a keen grasp of urban fashion, has been part of the 707 team since day one, when the store opened for business at Kemang Icon building. “We always made the effort and develop the concept from the start to carry cutting-edge brands from suppliers all around the world,” she says.

707 carries T-shirts, jeans, shoes, sunglasses, watches and accessories by such trend-setting brands as APC, Nudie, Surface2Air, Kidrobot, Cheap Monday, YyMC, Richard James, Superfine, Edun, Alife, aNYything and Melissa, and many more.

If you have never heard of 707 before, you are not alone. The owners deliberately refuse to advertise and have always kept a low profile since the boutique opened its doors in 2005. So how do they stay in business? Mostly by word of mouth, says Nana. Also by social media such as Facebook, Twitter, blogs, and weekly newsletters. Over time, 707 has grown and developed a loyal, trend-aware clientele.

Not long after the store opened, 707 expanded to Cilandak Town Square for a micro version of the store called 707 Annexes. In 2008, the two outlets were combined into a bigger space at the current Aksara complex on Kemang Raya. The store’s urban chic design features vintage furniture combined with modern minimalist, large windows, white brick walls and a classic barber chair.

Adam, who has been working at 707 for three years, says most customers at the store come in looking for unique and exclusive brands. “They dig the rare jeans, and it’s all about curve for them,” he says. Dressed in vintage Nike shoes, designer jeans, T-shirt and baseball hat, Adam says he is comfortable working at 707 because it fits his lifestyle. “I like everything original; my style is simple, I want to be able to feel not just see the product,” he says.

Staying One Step Ahead

707 products typically create a buzz; their first launch for Nike drew lines of 400 people, with many sleeping outside the store overnight, because they knew it was an exclusive line not available at Nike stores in the malls or anywhere in Jakarta. Many other brands such as Nudie, Cheap Monday, Ksubi and Melissa only allow their limited-edition products to be sold in 707. “Most of the lines we carry are exclusive,” says Nana.

Monitoring trends is a key aspect in a business that aims to deliver fresh products. “We regularly keep an eye on magazines, the internet, television and follow the current buzz,” says Nana. “We also look into the background and the people behind the brand. That has always been one way for us to consider and choose a product.”

One product always in demand at 707 is denim. At 707 you can easily find rare and high-quality salvage jeans from Japan with brands such as Imperial, Naked & Famous and many others. Rare jeans at 707 can be priced as high as Rp 7 million.

“Preppy style is the new look for the season,” says Nana. Around Kemang and other hip areas in Jakarta, you can easily spot teenagers and young adults wearing retro glasses, buttoned shirts, chino pants and loafer shoes. Being preppy is cooler than ever, in comparison to previous years when sneakers and T-shirts dominated the urban market. The sneaker rack that used to be the Nike shoe display has been replaced with loafers and boots.

How do they deal with competition from knockoff merchandise? “We don’t worry about that because our customers appreciate quality and love the brand they are seeking. I don’t think they would consider imitations; besides it feels much better paying and wearing originals,” says Nana.

Serving only the best and meeting the demand for exclusive products have proven successful strategies for 707. For customers of this high-end boutique, the rare and limited-edition items on offer are worth every penny.

Iwan Putuhena Reports

Original article was published in Kemang Buzz

Definition of Cool: 707

Pictures by Dissy for Kemang Buzz

707

Jl. Kemang Raya No. 8B, (next to Aksara, under Casa)
Tel: 021 718 0051
info@sevenohseven.com
sevenohseven.com

My Kemang: Dhiah, Clubber

Dhiah, 21, spends several nights a week clubbing in Kemang and is a regular guest at a number of venues. We caught up with Dhiah at Venue, one of her favorite clubs in South Kemang. She talked about what she loves about the nightlife in Kemang, the hottest places to party and her resolution for the new year.

How often do you hang out in Kemang?
I started coming here around four years ago. Back then I hung out in this area almost every day; lately I’ve cut it down to about three times a week (laughs).

What do you normally do around Kemang?
My night usually starts at Shisha Café, dinner at KFF (Kemang Food Fest), then off to Triple Nine, Venue, Nu China, or wherever the party’s at.

Where do you go most often?
I like to go to Venue, it’s one of my favorite places, because on Mondays it’s 50 percent off for drinks, and Wednesdays is ladies night with R&B music. I feel like I’m promoting the place now (laughs).

Do you get privileges as a regular?
Of course, but I already get special privileges just for being a lady; I’m talking about free drinks and entry on ladies night. I normally get invitations and guest list to places almost every day. And almost everywhere I go, there are people who also party as much as I do. We know each other from hanging out, so we join tables and party together.

Do you call yourself a ‘clubber’?
I don’t go clubbing to get that title or recognition. I just happen to really enjoy going out, being with friends, being around people, talking and drinking. So I think it’s an accidental status (laughs).

What’s the hottest nightclub right now?
I would say Second Floor, because they recently renovated the club and it’s packed almost every night.

Do you live in Kemang?
No, I live in Central Jakarta, behind Grand Indonesia, because it’s closer to my work place. But I would love to be in Kemang. I used to live here a few years back. It was comfortable because everything is in the area. But being away doesn’t stop me from partying here.

Why do you choose to party here, it’s so far from where you live?
It’s my second home. When you’re in the area, everything is near and convenient; the clubs, restaurants, boutiques and lounges. Everything is within a walking distance, so it’s easy to hop around.

Where do you work?
I work in public relations at After Hour Sarinah, a billiard bar in Central Jakarta. Before that I was an SPG (sales promotion girl) for a variety of products and brands.

Where are you originally from?
I’m originally from South Jakarta, born and raised, so I’m comfortable with the area and I’m not scared to go places by myself or to walk in the street.

Do you think Kemang is affordable?
Well, it depends. There are expensive places and fine restaurants, but I think there are many more places for young people and professionals that are affordable.

What do you drink when you go out?
I would like to drink my favorite liquor, Johnny Walker Blue Label, but since I can only afford Black Label, anything mixed with that will do just fine. My friends and I usually buy bottles, because it’s much cheaper at the end of the night than buying drinks by the glass.

Do you have a boyfriend?
Yes, he is a DJ at one of the clubs in the area. But I don’t go to Kemang because of him, because he plays classic disco, and I’m not really into that (laughs).

What don’t you like about Kemang?
Not being able to get a table especially when you really looking forward to go to that particular place whether it’s at the club or restaurant. Kemang is always crowded, and it happens a lot, particularly over the weekend, some places don’t take reservations.

What is your New Year resolution?
I will try to quit smoking, because lately I’m starting to feel like I’m getting short of breath. But I’m not ready to quit drinking just yet (laughs). In the beginning I wasn’t a smoker but when I’m drinking it makes me want to smoke, so it will be a challenge.

Recently the government banned smoking inside public buildings. Do you think they should regulate that for clubs?
Well it would be nice to provide an outdoor space for smokers, like a balcony or roof top. I think it’s a good idea to enforce the non-smoking law in the club, because sometimes when everyone smokes in a packed room with bad circulation, my eyes gets watery and my clothes and hair will smell like smoke when I get home.

Do you think there will ever be a “last call” for partying?
Not anytime soon (laughs). Only when I’m in mourning, like recently when my father passed away. I was sad and stopped going out for 10 days, but then I couldn’t resist wanting to go out again. I guess I can say partying is kind of like a healing process for me.

Dhiah was talking to Iwan Putuhena

Original interview was published in Kemang Buzz

My Kemang: Dhiah, Clubber

Picture by Iwan Putuhena

Saving Lives : Medic One Indonesia

We can only wish that dialing 911 for an emergency worked internationally, because that seems to be a number that gets worldwide recognition, even though it’s only relevant in the United States. The number to dial for emergency services here in Jakarta — 118 — is listed in any directory. But have you actually tried it? When you call that number, you may as well leave your fate to luck.

“I think Bluebird is the ambulance of Jakarta. It’s much faster if you call them instead,” said Ronny Adhipurna, 41, former director of Medikaloka Health Care and co-founder of Medic One Indonesia.

An internationally accredited medical organization formed in 2008, Medic One is the first of its kind to provide 24-hour emergency and medical services in Indonesia. Located on Jl. Prapanca Raya, Medic One is serviced by a team of primary care and emergency physicians, as well as surgeons and public health specialists that operate throughout the Asia Pacific region.

In Malaysia, when you call the government emergency number the response time is about 15 minutes, in Tokyo it’s four minutes, in Los Angeles nine minutes, and if you live in Singapore it’s seven minutes. But if you live in Jakarta, it could take as long as an hour, or more in rush hour traffic.

When Ronny’s brother Andy died of a heart attack at the age of 28, it took the ambulance nearly one hour to arrive at his house. Ronny decided to take matters into his own hands. He and co-founder Savitri Wirahadikusumah (Vivi), who also had a bitter experience with Indonesia’s poor emergency services, opened Medic One in 2008 with Ronny as director and Vivi as operations manager. Vivi had started developing the idea to open an emergency service in 2001, after completing her studies in hospital management and international health at George Washington University. During her research she met Ronny, who shared the same vision, and together they began planning Medic One.

Quick response

Those of us who have never experienced an emergency situation may not realize the importance of being prepared until it is too late. Each passing second during an emergency is precious. Medic One is trying to educate the public on basic first aid skills and procedures. “We are prone to face an emergency situation at one time or another. It’s best to prepare and focus on at least knowing how to save your family in the event of an emergency,” said Ronny.

Medic One works with hospitals, companies, building management staff, and schools around Jakarta to share knowledge and lessons on first aid. “I advise building management teams and small businesses in the area to give us a call to train their employees in first aid,” Ronny said. Medic One also provides first-aid training to drivers, assistants, security guards, maids and other household staff.

One of Medic One’s primary missions is to recruit well-trained volunteer first-aiders who can provide immediate aid or extra support for its SALT (Save a Life Team) response group. Medic One also trains teachers and schoolchildren on basic first aid skills to safeguard their schools. Medic One hopes they will become first-aid “ambassadors” and pass on their lifesaving skills to their communities. There are presently more than 3000 SALT first aiders and Medic One hopes to recruit an additional 2,000 first-aiders in the next year.

“Remember what happened to the expat at the Marriott? He died not because of the bomb, but because no one, not even the police, knew how to stop the bleeding! He was just there at the curb being filmed by journalists, but no one came to help until 40 minutes later! The bleeding was so severe that when he arrived at the hospital it was too late,” said Ronny.
Medic One team not only focuses on medical training, but also has medical emergency assistants, and a concierge medical service that tracks its patients’ medical records. A patient’s medical information is essential to preventing a wrong diagnosis or other complications. Medical details, such as blood type or allergies to certain medications, can be critical factors in saving a life. Each call and medical questions to Medic One Team are recorded to assist the doctors and nurses in providing proper care in the case of an emergency.

Medic One Team regularly drills its team to shorten response times. “Within metropolitan Jakarta, Medic One’s response time is 16 to 21 minutes,” said Ronny. “We conduct site surveys so we know the quickest route to your house or office. And we know that traffic is always a problem for Jakarta, so we also have a motorcycle paramedic responder who can assist immediately.”

Iwan Putuhena Reports

Original article was published in Kemang Buzz

Saving Lives: Medic One Indonesia

Pictures Courtesy of Medic One Indonesia and Iwan Putuhena

Medic One Indonesia
Jl. Prapanca Raya No. 6A,
Tel: 021 7215 9100; Fax: 021 739 9303
http://www.medic-one.org;
Twitter@MedicOne_id