Petromak: Blast from the Past

A new resto boasts retro feel and hipster appeal | The new Petromak cafe shines a light on Indonesian comfort food and unique takes on classic dishes

Petromak, a new restaurant at La Codefin, features a retro Indonesian concept that has created a buzz among Kemang hipsters since it opened in May. Owned by a group of Indonesian actors and actresses — Baim Wong, Lukman Sardi, Ririn Dwi Ariyanti and Ririn Ekawati— the restaurant is named after petromak lights, the traditional Indonesian oil lamps that were used in villages before the arrival of electricity service and are still commonly used today by street vendors and fishermen.

The semi-outdoor restaurant has a modern interior with a traditional feel. There are mini-petromak lights on the ceiling and tables, along with gerobak (food wagons) that offer ice cream and other deserts.

The Petromak menu offers a varied selection of main dishes — from burgers and steaks such as Johnny Wong Steak, blue cheese sirloin steak and honey dijon salmon steak, as well as an Italian pasta section featuring fettuccine alfredo and spaghetti with mushroom or meat sauce. In the Indonesian corner, you’ll find Petromak fried rice, buntut bakar, gado-gado and traditional rice wrapped in banana leaves, such as nasi pedas, nasi ulam, and nasi liwet bakar.

The main specialty dish at the restaurant is the Johnny Wong Steak, a sirloin steak with mushroom sauce. (Priced at Rp 99,000, it is the most expensive entrée in the menu.) The steak is served with rice and sweet soy sauce on the side.

“My tongue is very Indonesian, so normally, I’m not too crazy about steak. However, I have to say the steak at Petromak unlike any other,” said Irma, a customer who is a Kemang regular.

The fried rice is not like the ordinary fried rice you’ll find elsewhere either. At Petromak, the fried rice has a slightly yellow color, similar to nasi kuning (a traditional yellow rice dish), and is served with fried chicken, meatballs, mushrooms, shrimp and basil leaves.

“The fried rice is tasty and authentic, kind of reminds me of Tom Yum (spicy Thai soup) in a way, because of the shrimp and mushroom,” said Dicky, a customer from Singapore.

Petromak serves a few signature cocktails, such as Green Petromak, Kemang Sunset and Sweet Apricot as well as mocktails like Dewa Monkey, Petromak Plus and Petromak Special. These can be enjoyed with finger foods like fried tofu, nachos, chicken wings and more.

Petromak offers a relaxed setting where you can enjoy a varied selection of both Indonesian and Western foods at pocket-friendly prices.

Iwan Putuhena Reports

Original article was published in Kemang Buzz

Petromak: Blast from the Past

Pictures by Dissy for Kemang Buzz

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The Food of Kings At Royal Persian

We are all familiar with kebabs, the skewered grilled meats served at many food courts, restaurants, and street stands. While most of us might believe the kebab is a Middle Eastern food, it actually originated in Persia (now Iran).

So what distinguishes Persian cuisine from other Middle Eastern dishes? The simple answer lies in the seasonings and spices. Persian food consists of more saffron-based dishes, and fruits are used extensively both on their own or as seasoning. Middle Eastern food is more often flavored with mint, coriander, parsley and Zatar (a wild thyme herb blend). Middle Eastern food also uses more olive oils, while Persian cuisine uses butter.

“There are some spices that we can’t get in Jakarta. To get the authentic Persian flavors, we ship them exclusively from Iran,” says Alex, the Iranian co-owner of Royal Persian. Ingredients such as baghali (broad beans), zaferan (saffron), and zereshk (dried berry-type fruit) are expensive and not available in the city.

“You have to understand that Persian and Middle Eastern are entirely different cultures,” he adds.

Alex has been living in Jakarta for more than five years. In 2010, he and his partner Hooman, also from Iran, decided to open Royal Persian in Kemang. “I wanted to introduce Persian food to the friendly Indonesian people who are always eager and curious to try new food,” Hooman explains.

“I believe that we are the only restaurant that serves Persian food in the city,” Alex adds.

Located on Jl. Kemang Raya, the spacious restaurant has an outdoor terrace and can easily accommodate 100 guests. Adorned with beautiful Persian rugs and traditional art works, the interior is cozy and dimly lit, with Persian music to set the mood.

Chef Esmai and Assistant-Chef Shahram, both from Iran, ensure guests will have an authentic Persian culinary experience. The menu naturally features various kebab dishes, served in generous portions and priced very reasonably, starting from Rp 50,000. Try the popular koobideh kebab which is made from ground lamb mixed with parsley, chopped onion, turmeric and seasoning, served with roasted tomato. Or the bakhtiari kebab, a combination of lamb, beef tenderloin and chicken breast. There are also the barg kebab, chenjeh kebab, and soltani kebab, as well as tasty chicken or fish kebabs.

If you prefer a non-kebab dish, there is the shishlik, one of the most lavish dishes in Iranian cuisine, which is lamb chops cut from the rack, marinated in a saffron-scented mixture of yogurt, garlic, and lemon juice. Along with the entrees, you can order naan breads or various types of rice, including baghali rice, barberry rice and biryani rice.

To finish off your meal, try the sholezard, a very sweet and delicious Iranian dessert made of saffron, sugar and rice.

Every guest is offered a complimentary traditional drink, khak shir (earth milk), a delicious and refreshing drink, served cold and topped with brown flower seeds. If you want to try something different, doogh is another traditional drink, a combination of yogurt, carbonated water, cucumber, and dried mint. For tea drinkers, try the Persian tea, brewed the Persian way and ideal for enjoying with shisha, which is offered for guests to enjoy in both the indoor and outdoor dining areas.

Royal Persian also serves a wide selection of Indian and Indonesian food.

Iwan Putuhena Reports

Original article was published in Kemang Buzz

The Food of Kings At Royal Persian

Pictures by Dissy for Kemang Buzz

Royal Persian

Jl. Kemang Raya No. 27,
Tel: 021 719 4242, 021 719 4343
 
Opening Hours:
Monday – Sunday:
10.00 am – 02.00 am
 

Go Dutch at Dijan’s

f you’re looking for a Sunday brunch unlike the usual Jakarta hotel buffet fare, Dijan’s Pannekoeken and Poffertjes is the place to go. This intimate Dutch restaurant has a homey setting to enjoy pancakes and other Dutch specialties that call to mind grandma’s cooking.

I paid a visit to Dijan’s one recent rainy Sunday, after craving pancakes all morning. It’s early afternoon by the time I arrive after driving in the heavy rain. A security guard approaches with an umbrella to escort me from my car. I note it as a sign of good service, especially considering I’ve come unannounced and no one is aware that I’m here to do a restaurant review.

Entering Dijan’s I’m instantly reminded of my Dutch grandmother’s old house in South Jakarta — the stained glass with colorful tulips on the windows and front door, the wooden interiors, the porcelain and antique Dutch objects on display.
The restaurant has three sections — a lower floor, upper floor with a bar and an outside garden. Only a few tables are taken and I choose one on the upper floor, a non-smoking area. A waiter brings me a menu and I flip through the pages and go straight to the Pannekoeken section. I read through every single pancake description and they all sound tempting. There are pannekoeken served as a light meal, dessert, or as entrées. There are some with cheese, banana, strawberries, beef ragout, salad, ice cream, pretty much anything you can imagine. A shame I can’t try them all in one visit. I settle on the cheese and banana pannekoek.

I turn to the specials and review the Dutch brunch entrées. I had read before coming that the bitterballen (meatballs) were very good. I also consider the hutspot met gehakt (sweet potato and vegetables with meatballs). The vegetables are served with light cream, steamed French beans, carrots, potatoes, cabbage, sautéed onions, and two big meatballs seasoned with pepper and onions.

Another dish that catches my attention is the kakap ala meuniere, a snapper deep-fried in bread crumbs, which sounds like the Dutch version of fish and chips.

It is served with spinach and French beans cooked in butter and garlic, a baked tomato with sautéed onions and potato wedges. There are also some Indonesian dishes on the menu, and even spaghetti.

In the end it’s a toss-up between the Holland biefstuk (beef steak), which is tenderloin served with sautéed potatoes, vegetable and special jus (sauce), and the stamppot spinazie (spinach stew) with bratwurst or beef burger. I ask the waiter for a recommendation, and he says that since I am ordering two courses, it would be wise to go with the stamppot spinazie, which is a smaller portion and a favorite of many customers.

And then my food arrives, both courses at the same time. Both dishes look delicious and equally enticing, and I have to pause to consider which one to try first. I decide to start with Dijan’s specialty, the pannekoek with cheese and banana, which is best eaten warm.

As I take the first bite, I’m transported at once to my grandmother’s kitchen. I immediately know this is the real deal. The pannekoeken from my childhood days used to have just some sprinkles of sugar, but the melted cheese and banana are a delicious combination.

After savoring the nostalgic moment, I am ready for my stamppot spinazie with bratwurst. It’s a delightful presentation and very Dutch — bratwurst with sautéed onion on top, spinach mixed with potatoes and butter and a baked tomato. The bratwurst could have been better, but I eat everything on my plate.

I review the menu for the poffertjes featured for dessert. Poffertjes are basically warm coin-sized pancakes topped with all types of fruits and ice cream. I will skip them for now, but will be sure to have them next time.

I come away from my excellent Dutch brunch entirely satisfied. Dijan’s cuisine is authentic Dutch fare one can enjoy as a full meal, a light snack or a quick stop for dessert. I know I’ll be returning soon to try the other dishes.

Iwan Putuhena Reviews

Original article was published in Kemang Buzz

Go Dutch at Dijan’s

Pictures by Iwan Putuhena

Dijan’s Pannekoeken & Poffertjes

Jl. Kemang Selatan, No. 102A
Hours: Weekdays 10am – 11pm; Weekends 10am – midnight
Tel: 021 7179 3538